2018 Gathering Musical Guests

This Year the Scottish Gathering’s Celtic Entertainment

is dedicated to the memory of

JED MARUM

A gifted singer, a unique and talented musician, an accomplished songwriter, and a longtime friend of the Salado Museum and the Scottish Gathering. Jed generously shared his love of American, Bluegrass and Celtic Folk music in songs that reflected his keen interest in history and the passing of cultural traditions from generation to generation.

He will be greatly missed and long remembered…

Jed Marum: 1952 – 2018

 

 

Ed Miller

Ed Miller is a singer and folklorist whose performances deliver a real taste of Scotland. He is a native of Edinburgh who came to Texas as a young man and has made Austin his home. Hailed as “one of the finest singers to come out of the Scottish Folksong Revival”, Ed engages his audiences with historical notes on the music of Scotland … and always invites his listeners to join in the song. His performances reflect both his continuing love for his homeland and his musical connections to his adopted home in Texas.

 

 

 

Carl Peterson

Carl Peterson is Scottish folksinger raised on the banks of the River Clyde where he learned the traditional songs of Scotland, Ireland, and England, as well as contemporary music of the times, from his family and friends. A performance by Carl is best described as a warm, everyone-involved, familiar evening-at-home experience. After learning to play guitar and banjo, Carl added American folk songs and storytelling to his repertoire and took it all from Scotland to Canada and then to the U.S. where he stays busy performing at Celtic festivals and concerts.

 

 

 

Hugh Morrison

Wick born Hugh Morrison is at home with the real Scottish dance band style of music heard in many “Ceilidh dance halls” across Scotland. Scottish ceilidh (pronounced kay-lee) music is defined by the rollicking, cheery accordion and fiddle melodies played by the likes of Sir Jimmy Shand & his Band, with whom Hugh Morrison chanced to study. Unlike its better-known relative, Irish button accordion, Scottish button accordion retains the hard-driving, working class rhythms of its origins in public dance halls. In addition to his grounding in ceilidh playing, Morrison is equally adept at the complex tunes of modern Celtic music.

 

 

 

Murder The Stout

Murder the Stout plays progressive Celtic Rock music led by native Scotsman, Hugh Morrison, on lead vocals & squeezebox.  Also in the lineup are Neil DuFour, Johnny Rioux, David Schaefer, Marcus Hollar, Jason Bancroft & Pete Sosa. MTS have been compared to a Scottish version of The Pogues, with folk, rock, punk & ska as well as Celtic influences all apparent in their music.  MTS released a 7 track EP in early 2012 to much critical acclaim prompting multiple label interest & multiple award nominations. Work is now on for a 2nd full length studio album, to be produced by Street Dogs’ Johnny Rioux, whose recent work includes Flatfoot 56 and Roger Miret & the Disasters.  MTS are in demand at most of the nations major Celtic Festivals and tour when their schedule allows.

 

Joe Romeo

Joe Romeo performs a mixture of Celtic songs and tunes from the 1700’s to the present both in English, Irish and Scots Gaelic, accompanied alternately by the Scottish Small Pipes and the Irish Bouzouki. Joe studied singing with Shae Black of the famous Black family of Ireland, Bouzouki with Alan Murray of Glasgow, Scotland, and music theory with Ron Anthony, guitarist to Frank Sinatra. He began playing the Small Pipes in the early 1980’s when they were rescued from extinction.